Can You Make Quitting Smoking Your New Year’s Resolution?

We hope you had a wonderful time ringing in the new year!  Now it’s time to decide on your new year resolutions.  We have one in particular in mind that we can help you with.  So consider taking on this resolution:  Quit smoking.  Or help a loved one quit cigarettes or other tobacco products.  

We all know smoking is bad for our health and the health of those exposed to secondhand smoke too.  Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Californians suffer undue illness and premature death from the use of tobacco products.

Did you know we can help you by prescribing nicotine replacement medications?  Not just the gum, lozenges, and patches.  We can also give you prescription-only nicotine replacement medications like the nasal spray and inhaler.

 You may have tried to quit before, and felt discouraged if you were unable to stay quit. You may wonder what services are available to help you quit, or if you want help to quit.  A new California law allows pharmacists to provide prescription nicotine replacement medications without a doctor’s prescription to help you quit tobacco. This increases access to these medications for you, and makes them more affordable. Counseling and medication options are effective on their own, but are even more effective when combined. When you are ready to quit tobacco, remember to ask your pharmacist for help.

You can book your appointment on our website or give us a call today!

Hope to see you in clinic soon!  

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Tobacco smoke interacts with medications and affects the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or elimination of other drugs, potentially causing an altered pharmacologic response. Any smoker is susceptible to the same degree of interaction. Some of the most significant interactions are with the following medications:

  • Caffeine
  • Coumadin (warfarin)
  • Plavix (clopidogrel)
  • Hormonal contraceptives (birth control pills, patch, ring)
  • Clozaril (clozapine)
  • Lopressor or Toprol XL (metoprolol)
  • Zyprexa (olanzapine)
  • Insulin
  • Requip (ropinirole)
  • Chemotherapy: Camptosar (irinotecan) and Tarceva (erlotinib)

If you smoke and take any medications, we can review any potential interactions and make sure your dosages are appropriate and monitor for complications.

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